There are 44 gray wolf packs in the Pacific West. Do you know their stories?

How many gray wolf packs live in your state?

By clicking on the links below, you can learn more about each of the gray wolf packs in Northern California, Oregon & Washington.

New Pacific Wolf Family Video!

Every wolf pack has a story. Here in the Pacific West, gray wolves are returning to Washington, Oregon and California. How did they journey here and why? In an effort to raise awareness about this iconic, wild species, we are thrilled to announce the Pacific Wolf Family video, which is a great way to learn more about gray wolves and their returns home.

Do you know their stories? Watch the Pacific Wolf Family video to learn more:

Latest News

  • july 2 2014October 2019 – Wolf news from Oregon: The Indigo Wolves have had pups! There are only two confirmed packs in Western Oregon (the Rogue Pack and the White River Pack). But soon the Indigo Wolves may officially become the third. The US Fish & Wildlife Service and Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife confirmed this week that the family is raising at least four pups. Welcome to the world, Indigo pups!
  • February 2019 – Wolf News from California: Wolf OR-54 (a daughter of OR-7, “Journey” of the Rogue Pack in Oregon), traveled back into Nevada County, California, this year. She spent some time exploring the Tahoe National Forest. This is her second visit, following her first foray into California in June 2018.
  • April 2019 – Wolf news from Oregon: Oregon’s wolf count increased by 10%, to a total of 137 gray wolves at the end of 2018. There are now wolves living in the North Cascades in Mt. Hood National Forest. Additionally, the “Indigo wolves” were confirmed to be the first-ever modern wolves to live in the wilderness of the Umpqua National Forest. Oregon’s pack numbers have grown from 12 to 16. The state’s annual wolf report can be viewed here.
  • April 2019 – Wolf news from Washington: The state’s annual wolf report indicates there are now 27 packs in Washington. Most exciting, there’s a pack living west of the Cascades for the first time in many decades. The state has confirmed a total of 126 wolves as of the end of 2018. Washington’s annual wolf report can be viewed here.

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